science-junkie:

plant-a-day:

Photos courtesy of Huhu Uet (1) (2), RasbakWalter J. Pilsak, and Wutsje

Heracleum mantegazzianum aka Giant Hogweed and Giant Cow Parsnip. Family Apiaceae. Native to the Caucasus Region and Central Asia, although it has spread much farther after being used as an ornamental. Distribution maps for North America and Europe for those interested. Giant Hogweed is phototoxic. If any sap comes in contact with human skin and is then activated by sunlight, the skin will blister and likely scar. The sap can also cause blindness, so be careful! Hardy in zones 3-9. 

And here’s the soundtrack for this post…

(The Return Of The Giant Hogweed - Genesis)

Choose carefully your ornamental plants. 

"yesterday, i spent 60 dollars on groceries,
took the bus home,
carried both bags with two good arms back to my studio apartment
and cooked myself dinner.
you and i may have different definitions of a good day.
this week, i paid my rent and my credit card bill,
worked 60 hours between my two jobs,
only saw the sun on my cigarette breaks
and slept like a rock.
flossed in the morning,
locked my door,
and remembered to buy eggs.
my mother is proud of me.
it is not the kind of pride she brags about at the golf course.
she doesn’t combat topics like, ”my daughter got into yale”
with, ”oh yeah, my daughter remembered to buy eggs”
but she is proud.
see, she remembers what came before this.
the weeks where I forgot how to use my muscles,
how i would stay as silent as a thick fog for weeks.
she thought each phone call from an unknown number was the notice of my suicide.
these were the bad days.
my life was a gift that i wanted to return.
my head was a house of leaking faucets and burnt-out lightbulbs.
depression, is a good lover.
so attentive; has this innate way of making everything about you.
and it is easy to forget that your bedroom is not the world,
that the dark shadows your pain casts is not mood-lighting.
it is easier to stay in this abusive relationship than fix the problems it has created.
today, i slept in until 10,
cleaned every dish i own,
fought with the bank,
took care of paperwork.
you and i might have different definitions of adulthood.
i don’t work for salary, i didn’t graduate from college,
but i don’t speak for others anymore,
and i don’t regret anything i can’t genuinely apologize for.
and my mother is proud of me.
i burned down a house of depression,
i painted over murals of greyscale,
and it was hard to rewrite my life into one i wanted to live
but today, i want to live.
i didn’t salivate over sharp knives,
or envy the boy who tossed himself off the brooklyn bridge.
i just cleaned my bathroom,
did the laundry,
called my brother.
told him, “it was a good day.”"

kait rokowski, “a good day” (via uncooljerk)
heaveninawildflower:

'In Wormley Wood' (1886), watercolour by Helen Allingham.
'At the time when this drawing was painted, this cottage, lying snugly in the recesses of 'Wormley Wood, was the last specimen of thatch in the neighbourhood, and only continued so to be due to the intervention of a well-known artist who lived not far off. That artist is dead, and probably in the score of years which have since elapsed the thatch has gone the way of the rest, the harmony of yellowish greys which existed between it and its background have given way to a gaudy contrast of unweathered red tiles or cold unsympathetic blue slates.
The cottage may well date back to Tudor times, and the sweetwilliams, pansies and lavender which border the path to it may be the descendants of far-away progenitors, culled by a long-forgotten labourer in his master’s ‘nose-gay’ garden, which at that time was a luxury for the well-to-do only.’
From ‘Happy England’ as painted by Helen Allingham, R.W.S. With memoir and descriptions, by Marcus B. Huish.
Published 1903.
http://www.archive.org/stream/happyenglandasp00alligoog#page/n9/mode/2up

heaveninawildflower:

'In Wormley Wood' (1886), watercolour by Helen Allingham.

'At the time when this drawing was painted, this cottage, lying snugly in the recesses of 'Wormley Wood, was the last specimen of thatch in the neighbourhood, and only continued so to be due to the intervention of a well-known artist who lived not far off. That artist is dead, and probably in the score of years which have since elapsed the thatch has gone the way of the rest, the harmony of yellowish greys which existed between it and its background have given way to a gaudy contrast of unweathered red tiles or cold unsympathetic blue slates.

The cottage may well date back to Tudor times, and the sweetwilliams, pansies and lavender which border the path to it may be the descendants of far-away progenitors, culled by a long-forgotten labourer in his master’s ‘nose-gay’ garden, which at that time was a luxury for the well-to-do only.’

From ‘Happy England’ as painted by Helen Allingham, R.W.S.
With memoir and descriptions, by Marcus B. Huish.

Published 1903.

http://www.archive.org/stream/happyenglandasp00alligoog#page/n9/mode/2up


Rudbeckia hirta by Constance Sayas

Rudbeckia hirta by Constance Sayas

oakapples:

Just published in Annals of Botany is a study by Brillouet et al. that demonstrates the existence of a novel organelle in plant cells. This newcomer to plant cellular ultrastructure, which the authors dub the ‘tannosome’, is a chloroplast-derived structure that acts as the…


Panda Cub in Tree by (Official San Diego Zoo)

Panda Cub in Tree by (Official San Diego Zoo)

oliviatheelf:

healingwithphoenixtears:

aviolafyre:

This is maybe my favorite picture in the world.

Agreed

It brings me so much joy. <3

oliviatheelf:

healingwithphoenixtears:

aviolafyre:

This is maybe my favorite picture in the world.

Agreed

It brings me so much joy. <3

"Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things."

Philippians 4:8 NIV

a-list-playlist:

Fleet Foxes - Drops In The River

on the shore, speak to the ocean and receive silence